The Friday after Thanksgiving is known as Black Friday because it is said that many businesses operate "in the red" through the year, and the day after Thanksgiving is when the Christmas season kicks off as shoppers prepare for gift-giving. So, that's when businesses move beyond the red to the black (or the the point of breaking even and making a profit).

As more conveniences emerge like free shipping, broken payments, etc., consumers are spending more money online than ever before, which could present a problem for small businesses.

Even before COVID-19 began, Small Business Saturday was established as a means of promoting the patronizing of small, often local businesses.

Small businesses are said to be part of the intricacies of the economy. Think of an article of clothing you're currently wearing and the small strands that compose an inch of fabric. It only takes a few of those strands to be broken before there is a hole in the article.

Such is the case when it comes to small businesses. The interweaving is what creates the strength of the unit, and when enough of the strands break, the hole in the economy is noticeable and sometimes not easily fixed.

So, it is our responsibility to make sure these strands are not broken and that the economy maintains its strength and grows even stronger if at all possible. The best way for this to happen is to support small businesses.

While it would be ideal for consumers to support small businesses as much as larger businesses, sometimes it's just not feasible... And it doesn't have to be.

Simply find at least two small businesses with items you want or need, and make a purchase at each. If we all did the same, small businesses would flourish.

So, while we prepare to give gifts to friends and loved ones, let's remember to show love to our families and friends who are entrepreneurs. Small Business Saturday is set aside for them.

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6 Ways Shopping Local Helps Tuscaloosa

6 Ways Shopping Local Helps Tuscaloosa