Can you imagine being the person who makes the clerical error that frees an accused murderer?

That's exactly what a now-former employee of the Lowndes County sheriff's department in Columbus, Miss. recently faced. According to the Associated Press, 26-year-old Malcolm Hill , who along with his girlfriend, was charged with capital murder in 2018. This occurred while he was on parole from other crimes of which he was convicted.

Luckily, Hill was found in Foley, Ala. just days after being released and is now back at the detention center, and jail officials are said to be reviewing other cases to make sure proper detainer documents are filed. Source.

The error that led to the release has not been disclosed, but can you imagine how it must have felt for the person responsible (who no longer works there, by the way) if it was accidental?

Have you ever made a mistake at work that could have cost you your job?  Did you actually lose it?  If not, what happened after the error was noticed?

Here's mine.... Well, actually, it's happened more than once:

When I worked at UPS, people would call just before the drivers left and request to have their packages placed on hold.  I would tell them that I would go to get the packages off the cars, but sometimes I'd get sidetracked and forget to take them off.  So, the customers would come to the center to pick up their packages, which weren't there of course.  This also means that they'd usually miss their deliveries.

To keep from inconveniencing the customers and from having the company to receive a negative mark, I'd take it upon myself to go out and deliver the packages myself.  With the way things are going now, I certainly wouldn't deliver them by myself now; and I'm grateful that nothing ever happened to me back then.  I just REALLY believe in great customer service. So, righting my wrong was important.

I know I'm not alone in this, though.  What are some of YOUR work mishaps?