Alabama ranks at the bottom in terms of Census 2020 response.  In fact, participation is so low that the state launched a Census Bowl in the 32 counties with the poorest response.

For those who are unaware, the U.S. Census Bureau conducts a count of the nation’s population every 10 years.  This dates back as far as 1790.

Alabama Counts! states the following:

The data collected during the census is used in a variety of ways that affect decisions regarding community services provided to residents and the distribution of more than $675 billion in federal funds to local, state and tribal governments each year. This funding supports local programs for schools, health care, community assistance, infrastructure and other important needs. The census also determines the number of representatives each state will have in Congress.

The Alabama Department of Economic and Community Affairs and Alabama Counts! created a contest among the counties with low self-response rates.  The competition will end on September 30, which is also the final date for household census participation.

Winning counties are said to be eligible for up to $65,000 to benefit their public school systems, to be awarded in October. Source.

These are the participating counties:

  • Baldwin
  • Barbour
  • Bibb
  • Bullock
  • Butler
  • Cherokee
  • Choctaw
  • Conecuh
  • Coosa
  • Crenshaw
  • Clarke
  • Dallas
  • DeKalb
  • Greene
  • Hale
  • Henry
  • Lamar
  • Lowndes
  • Macon
  • Marengo
  • Monroe
  • Perry
  • Pike
  • Randolph
  • Russell
  • Sumter
  • Talladega
  • Tallapoosa
  • Walker
  • Washington
  • Wilcox
  • Winston

To check out the official bracket, click here.

So, residents in these counties should fill out the census forms and encourage their neighbors to do the same.  Otherwise, they might find themselves brainstorming for fundraiser ideas and selling Krispy Kreme doughnuts amid budget shortfalls, which could happen as a result of inaccurate population numbers.

If your county is a finalist, share this information and tag others who should.

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