Why Are We Ashamed To Talk About Human Trafficking?

Why are we ashamed to talk about human trafficking?  It’s real.  I was chatting with some friends over dinner one night, and the subject of human trafficking came up.  But, almost everyone at the table wanted to change the subject.  I was pretty upset that we couldn’t discuss this topic because we have children, women, and men that are exploited daily in our own communities.  However, we turn our heads to the problem since the subject is too taboo.  We have people going missing so consistently now that we are almost desensitized to it.

According to Homeland Security, human trafficking “involves the use of force, fraud, or coercion to obtain some type of labor or commercial sex act. Every year, millions of men, women, and children are trafficked worldwide – including right here in the United States.” 

What is alarming to me is the nature of sex trafficking because the Human Trafficking Institute reported that in “2018, over half (51.6%) of the criminal human trafficking cases active in the US were sex trafficking cases involving only children.”  The U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, reports that “the average age a teen enters the sex trade in the US is 12 to 14 years old. Many victims are runaway girls who were sexually abused as children.”  I am sad over these statistics and the fact that no one wants to talk about this huge issue for me.

Please talk your children, family, and friends about human trafficking.  According to the Jacksonville Free Press, “the State Board of Education has unanimously approved a new rule requiring instruction in child trafficking prevention for students in grades K-12. With this approval, Florida will be the first state in the nation to address the need for instruction in child trafficking prevention.”

You might bring awareness to someone that has been targeted by Traffickers that “use force, fraud, or coercion to lure their victims and force them into labor or commercial sexual exploitation.”  Talk to your kids about human trafficking and monitor their social media accounts, as well.  Here are some great tips from Unicef USA. 

Thanks for reading, my hope that it stirs conversation and makes you aware - @MaryKRadio

Other helpful sources as noted by www.DoSomething.org

Domestic Violence: National Domestic Violence Hotline, 24-hour Hotline:

1-800-799-SAFE (7233)

Sexual Abuse: Rape, Abuse, and Incest National Network (RAINN), 24-hour Hotline:

1-800-656-4673

Suicide: National Suicide Prevention Lifeline, 24-hour Hotline:

1-800-273-TALK (8255)

Dating Violence: National Dating Abuse Helpline, 24-hour Hotline:

1-866-331-9474

Runaway and Homeless Youth: National Runaway Safeline, 24-hour Hotline:

1-800-RUNAWAY (786-2929)

Missing Children and Child Pornography: National Center for Missing and Exploited Children, 24-hour Hotline:

1-800-THE-LOST (843-5678)