Chad L. Jackson is Black Excellence.

Chad L. Jackson, who has been in Alabama since 1991, is a shining example of Black Excellence in West Alabama. He feels that Black Excellence is “refusing marginalization, thriving amid both covert and overt obstacles and social constructs, and knowing who you are and what you bring to the table.”

Jackson started at The University of Alabama in October 2017 as the Contracts, Billing, and Analytics Specialist for the Bryant Conference Center. In 2018 he was appointed as the Vice-President for The University of Alabama Black Faculty and Staff Association, BFSA, and was elected President of BFSA in May 2020 for the 2020-2022 term.

In addition, he serves as the Committee Chairperson for the UA College of Continuing Studies Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion Committee and as the Third Vice President of the Tuscaloosa Chapter of the NAACP. In exciting news, Jackson was recently appointed to the Tuscaloosa Sister Cities Board of Directors.

Jackson navigated his presidency of the BFSA during the COVID-19 pandemic. His leadership has led the group to many milestones for the organization. Entering the virtual space was one of them. Jackson felt that “working in a virtual space increased BFSA's campus and community Visibility, Agility, and Access to and of our programs, advocacies, and outreach.”

Get our free mobile app

The UA BFSA hosted the first-ever black history event, the Dr. Trudier Harris Black History Scholars Bowl. The first of its kind for The University of Alabama, which also invited Historically Black Colleges and Universities, HBCU’s from Alabama.

Jackson developed an exciting partnership with The UA Supe Store to increase the visibility and access for the Nyansapo Kente Graduation Stole. Jackson said that “this partnership was re-featured in National Association of College Stores as it paved the way for other PWI’s to offer the Kente Stole to minority students.”

Recently, the 2021 BFSA Juneteenth Celebration was held in the virtual space. In an exciting interview with Ms. Opal Lee about her advocacy and humanitarian efforts weeks before Juneteenth became a Federal Holiday.

On the horizon, the University of Alabama’s BFSA is currently planning for the first-ever formal fundraiser. The Wakanda Scholarship Ball will be held on February 5th, 2022, at the Bryant Conference Center on the UA campus. Make sure you save the date.

When asked why the Black Faculty and Staff Association was important to The University of Alabama, Jackson noted that the “purpose of this organization shall be as an advocate for educational equity, emphasizing African American/Black students and the professional needs of its members (Faculty and Staff).  In the accomplishment of this general purpose, the organization shall promote and provide opportunities for networking, professional development, and advance educational opportunities through programming, advocacy, and outreach.”

LOOK: 50 essential civil rights speeches

Many of the speakers had a lifetime commitment to human rights, but one tried to silence an activist lobbying for voting rights, before later signing off on major civil rights legislation. Several fought for freedom for more than one oppressed group.

Keep reading to discover 50 essential civil rights speeches.

LOOK: 28 Modern Black History Makers & Moments

LOOK: A history of Black representation in movies

LOOK: 50 Black actors who made entertainment history

 

LOOK: Here are the biggest HBCUs in America

More than 100 historically Black colleges and universities are designated by the U.S. Department of Education, meeting the definition of a school "established prior to 1964, whose principal mission was, and is, the education of black Americans."

StudySoup compiled the 20 largest historically Black colleges and universities in the nation, based on 2021 data from the U.S. Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics. Each HBCU on this list is a four-year institution, and the schools are ranked by the total student enrollment.